Author Quick Chat with Kit Morgan

Hi, readers! Today I’ve got Kit Morgan here for a quick chat. I posed one question to Kit:

Who most inspired and encouraged your creative pursuits?



Here’s Kit’s response.

Kit and Father

That’s easy. My dad.

Pops was a quiet fellow, introspective and wise. He was also a homicide detective for thirty years, and told some pretty amazing stories at the dinner table growing up.  But I digress …

He also LOVED westerns.  In fact, my first western, His Prairie Princess, was dedicated to him, and what he said once about why he liked westerns so much, sums everything up nicely. He said:

“There’s just something about a western.  They’re so simple.  Good versus evil.  The cowboy or lawman has to save the girl then gets the girl.  You don’t need to dress them up; their purity alone tells a simple story that always satisfies.  That’s why I love westerns.”

The simplicity he talks about is the key to creativity for me.  People love simplicity, it’s why we read historical romance and love the western genre. We want a simpler life, and a western or historical romance gives us a glimmer of one, albeit someone else’s.  We also, deep within each of us, have a moral compass, that loves a good fight between good and evil. Couple that with calico dresses, fresh baked bread, milking the cow, and a budding romance with a handsome hero, and you have some fun elements to weave together to create that historical setting and story.

The fact that I grew up in a log cabin on twenty acres of woods adds to my creativity as well. I’ve recently moved back to that cabin in the woods because it definitely stimulates the muse.  Again, my father was the one that moved us from the city out to this little oasis, in hopes of giving us a better life, and indeed it did.  He almost took a job with LAPD. I can’t imagine how different our lives would have been growing up in Los Angeles, as opposed to our cabin in the woods.

But I’m not the only one in my family he influenced in the area of creative pursuits. My little sister is a racehorse jockey, and has had a thriving career. My daughter, also heavily influenced by her grandpa, is an actress/director, and does fashion photography.  He believed you had to fuel your creativity, be it through reading, music, sports, art, acting, whatever. And he was right.  He’s been one of the biggest influences to my writing, part of which comes from his incredible sense of humor. Naturally, I’m a humor writer.  One could say I write western comedy romance.  One of my latest books is a good example.  August (Prairie Grooms, Book One).  Grab a copy, and through my writing, get to know my dad.



 

Your turn, readers. Who has most inspired  and encouraged YOU?


 

 

About Kit Morgan:   A consistent Top 100 lists bestseller, Kit Morgan, aka Geralyn Beauchamp, has been writing for fun all of her life. When writing as Geralyn Beauchamp, her books are epic, adventurous, romantic fantasy at its best. When writing as Kit Morgan they are whimsical, fun, inspirational sweet stories that depict a strong sense of family and community. ‘His Prairie Princess’ is the first of the Prairie Brides books and the first in the series of a long line of stories about Clear Creek, Oregon. One of the whackiest little towns in the old west! Get to know the townsfolk in Clear Creek and come sit a spell!

If you like Kit Morgan’s books then you might also like the Time Master Book series written under Geralyn Beauchamp.



 

Check out August by Kit Morgan, the first book in the new Prairie Groom series.

What happens when six English ladies are shipped off halfway across the world as mail order brides? EVERYTHING! Watch them go from a posh lifestyle in London to Clear Creek, a nothing of a town full of quirky characters, crazy livestock, and bumbling villains! Oh, and handsome grooms too!

Duncan Cooke, aka The Duke of Stantham, also had a problem. He had a huge estate in England to manage, one not far from London, and it came with all the problems one would expect with an estate in disarray. Including six unwed cousins, women no man would touch for fear of losing either a limb, or worse. Strange things happened to all who tried to court them, so they were left untouched, and very unwed.

But Duncan realized that Clear Creek had exactly what he needed. Men! And so with the help of his brother’s wife Sadie, he concocted a plan to send his cousins to Clear Creek as mail order brides! He just hoped the calamity that often followed them, didn’t find its way across the sea as well …

August

 

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9 thoughts on “Author Quick Chat with Kit Morgan

  1. Yeah, I grew up on Gun Smoke, The Big Valley, Bonanza, Alias Smith and Jones, and then of course all those John Wayne movies! Pops also loved spaghetti westerns!

  2. Kathy Heare Watts says:

    Beautiful book cover! I love westerns, always have. Love reading about the land and the people who settled it. I am a big fan of mail order bride stories too.

    • Mail order brides are always popular. I think I might have to send a bride to my little town of “Sunset”. It would be a fun story to write, I’m sure. Or, maybe I’ll do a mail-order husband. I’ve toyed around with a few ideas.

  3. Loved reading about your dad’s influence on you. I’m the oldest in my family, and I think my dad had planned on having a boy. He taught me to play baseball and fish and how to drive a nail with a hammer, along with a million other things. By letting me try things (and sometimes fail), I learned to appreciate the great feeling that comes with accomplishing something. We sure were lucky to have great dads, weren’t we?

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