Author Quick Chat with Linda Rae Sande

Hi, readers! Today I’ve got historical author Linda Rae Sande here for a little chat. Here’s the question I asked Linda:

Which of your characters has been the most difficult to write?



Her answer:

Michael Cunningham.

Here’s what she had to say about him.

WatchIn TUESDAY NIGHTS, Michael Cunningham, the second son of Viscount Cunningham of Horsham, Sussex, England, is rather adept at business and making money. His association with Harold Waterford on a variety of business deals, including smelting and coal gas, will mean the Cunningham viscountcy will survive despite his brother’s tendency to gamble beyond his means. But a man’s ability at business dealings doesn’t mean he’s adept at everything else in life. In fact, Michael lacks the ability to communicate with the woman he has decided will be his wife once he’s reached the age of twenty-eight. He’s made arrangements with his business associate – Olivia Waterford’s father – to marry Olivia. However, as is the case with many men who are successful in business, he lacks the skills necessary to communicate with those who mean the most to him, including Olivia, as well as the ability to keep track of time. So he’s rather surprised when his sister informs him his twenty-eighty birthday is only three weeks away – and he hasn’t yet proposed to Olivia!

A Regency hero needs to be a likable protagonist, but making Michael Cunningham a sympathetic character was a tough job. One could only hope the reader was familiar with a man of his traits, perhaps because their father or husband or significant other suffers from the same character flaws. Otherwise, they would be of the opinion, as one of the book’s reviewers is, that Michael Cunningham is a ‘stinker’ and not worthy of Olivia’s affection. Women can be rather tolerant of a man’s shortcomings, however, and it’s this understanding that saves Michael from himself in Tuesday Nights.



Now, your turn. What makes a Regency hero likable to YOU?



Linda A self-described nerd and lover of science, Linda Rae spent many years as a published technical writer specializing in 3D graphics workstations, software and 3D animation (her movie credits include SHREK and SHREK 2). An interest in genealogy led to years of research on the Regency era and a desire to write fiction based in that time.

Now running the front office of a busy print shop, she’s developed an appreciation for pretty papers and spends time using them in her scrapbooks. She can frequently be found at the local cinema enjoying the latest movie. During the winter, she enjoys junior hockey and the San Jose Sharks, and an indeterminate number of tropical fish live with her year-round. She makes her home in Cody, Wyoming. See her upcoming books on her website:

 Linda Rae Sande.

 

 



Read Michael’s story in Tuesday Nights by Linda Rae Sande

If every man is a master of time, then what of the man who loses track of it?

A viscount’s son and a bare knuckle boxer, Michael Cunningham is more interested in building his fortune than spending time at the Marriage Mart. But long ago he promised his mother he would get married “if not before, then on the eve of my twenty-eighth birthday”.

Reminded by his sister, a duchess, that his next birthday is his twenty-eighth birthday, Michael realizes he has much to do in the three weeks he has to keep his promise – not the least of which is to secure the only woman he has ever considered for a wife – the younger daughter of his business partner and the very woman his sister has just hired to be a governess!

Linda Tuesday Nights

 

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